Re: Conservatories & skin damage

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Topic Title: Re: Conservatories & skin damage
Created On: 05/10/2001 04:06 PM

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 05/10/2001 04:06 PM

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notshown

Posts: 1369

Posted in alt.support.skin-diseasesMike Newman wrote: > Can anyone tell me whether the harmfull parts of sunlight are filtered out > by ordinary glass? Do I have to take protective action while in my > conservatory? Hi Mike - It depends on what you call the harmful part of sunlight, which touches slightly on a couple of different debates. Atmospheric UV is split into two bands, UVA which is just outside the visible rnage, and UVB which is mostly responsible for sunburns. Ordinary float glass passes UVA but blocks UVB, so it is similar to using a sunblock. That doesnt mean you are completely protected, especially if you have fair skin. Read up on the debate over sunblock use. Most sunblocks only screen UVB, but UVA appears to be responsibe for much of the long-term skin damage including wrinkling and various tumors (SCC, BCC, melnoma). Thus, the sunblocks give a false sense of security, allowing folks to overexpose themselves to UVA. Some special glasses and acrylics will pass UVB, which would only be a problem around mid-day, but they arent likely used in your greenhouse. If the glass has a greenish tint, then the iron impurities should guarantee the absorbtion of UVB and most UVA. (Borrow a meter from a local tanning salon if you want to check it the levels.) If you want complete protection, you can look into glass or acrylics designed for just the opposite, to block all UV. The acrylics used to protect artwork are not too expensive, and you would only need them under the roof. There is also conservation glass if any needs replacing, but it tends to be expensive. You might look into glazing materials, too. The plants shouldnt suffer without UVA, but you might look into the topic of full spectrum lighting. Working in a greenhouse that blocks UVB and some UVA at noon would probably be equivalent to working outdoors in the late afternoon, just to put things in perspective. You probably dont need to take protective action unless you are redhaired or otherwise concerned about long term risks of skin damage. Wearing a hat around midday is still a good idea. There were some interesting articles in Science News a couple of years ago. I believe theyre still online at http://sciencenews.org Research more at http://pinch.com/skin Youll also find weird debates about glass in the alt.folklore.urban groups. -- Ed some kinda UV buff Anderson
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 05/10/2001 04:06 PM

Author Icon
notshown

Posts: 1369

Posted in alt.support.skin-diseasesMike Newman wrote: > Can anyone tell me whether the harmfull parts of sunlight are filtered out > by ordinary glass? Do I have to take protective action while in my > conservatory? Hi Mike - It depends on what you call the harmful part of sunlight, which touches slightly on a couple of different debates. Atmospheric UV is split into two bands, UVA which is just outside the visible rnage, and UVB which is mostly responsible for sunburns. Ordinary float glass passes UVA but blocks UVB, so it is similar to using a sunblock. That doesnt mean you are completely protected, especially if you have fair skin. Read up on the debate over sunblock use. Most sunblocks only screen UVB, but UVA appears to be responsibe for much of the long-term skin damage including wrinkling and various tumors (SCC, BCC, melnoma). Thus, the sunblocks give a false sense of security, allowing folks to overexpose themselves to UVA. Some special glasses and acrylics will pass UVB, which would only be a problem around mid-day, but they arent likely used in your greenhouse. If the glass has a greenish tint, then the iron impurities should guarantee the absorbtion of UVB and most UVA. (Borrow a meter from a local tanning salon if you want to check it the levels.) If you want complete protection, you can look into glass or acrylics designed for just the opposite, to block all UV. The acrylics used to protect artwork are not too expensive, and you would only need them under the roof. There is also conservation glass if any needs replacing, but it tends to be expensive. You might look into glazing materials, too. The plants shouldnt suffer without UVA, but you might look into the topic of full spectrum lighting. Working in a greenhouse that blocks UVB and some UVA at noon would probably be equivalent to working outdoors in the late afternoon, just to put things in perspective. You probably dont need to take protective action unless you are redhaired or otherwise concerned about long term risks of skin damage. Wearing a hat around midday is still a good idea. There were some interesting articles in Science News a couple of years ago. I believe theyre still online at http://sciencenews.org Research more at http://pinch.com/skin Youll also find weird debates about glass in the alt.folklore.urban groups. -- Ed some kinda UV buff Anderson
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